July 15

Peace and Love Tour brings Woodstock nostalgia to Gwinnett

www.GwinnettDailyPost.com

By: Taylor Denman

Published: July 11, 2019


The Peace and Love Tour will make a stop on July 23 at the Infinite Energy Cener Theater in Duluth to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Woodstock, the famous music festival of 1969.

Fans can relive the music of Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Grateful Dead, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Crosby, Stills, and Nash, The Who and more from the Woodstock era, performed live by the national touring band Paisley Craze.

The six-piece tribute band will deliver an authentic experience with headbands, flower power and tie dye.

“We’re working overtime to really evoke the vibe of each performer or band,” bassist Marty Bednar said in a press release. “We’re not nitpicking so much on (playing) exact copies of the songs but more on the feel of the song so we can help folks remember the feeling and energy of the time.”

The set list will be focused on Woodstock artists sprinkled with some of the music made after the festival. The Peace and Love Tour will be more than a typical show from a tribute band. The special effects, sound bites, lighting and sound effects make the show an immersive experience.

There are 24 stops, mostly in the Southeast, on the Peace and Love Tour. The Paisley Craze will travel to Augusta, Gainesville and Savannah on July 24, 26 and 27, respectively.

There is a special buy-one-get-one offer available to customers that buy tickets online at infiniteenergycenter.com by entering the code BOGO.

The show begins at 7 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and patrons are encouraged to come early to attend pre-show festivities including photobooth, merchandise, history of the Woodstock era and much more. Most tickets cost between $22 to $41 according to infiniteenergycenter.com.

Tickets are available online at peaceandlovetour.com or by phone at 770-626-2464. The box office is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 6400 Sugarloaf Parkway in Duluth.

“Peace, love, unity and community, and coming together for a good cause are all major themes during the Woodstock era and God knows we need all of that right now,” Bednar said. “It can be healing and help us remember that we can make peace, love, empathy and compassion ... and fun primary features of our day-to-day lives, one person at a time.”